PRESS RELEASE

SimLab 12.0

Altair Engineering has announced that SimLab 12.0, a software tool created specifically as a pre-processor for detailed computer models of complex powertrains, has been released as part of HyperWorks 12.0, Altair’s suite of computer-aided engineering software. Because it now is integrated into HyperWorks, SimLab can be run with the same HyperWorks Units that designers and engineers use for all the other HyperWorks simulation tools, making it more accessible and cost-efficient than ever before.

The automotive industry can use SimLab for powertrain modelling and setup, along with OptiStruct 12.0 for powertrain analysis and optimisation. SimLab’s role in simulation preparation includes feature-based solid meshing for structures like the engine crankcase and cylinder head and the setup of simulation loads and boundary conditions. With SimLab 12.0, meshes require no manual clean-up as clean meshes are generated automatically. Altair states that, overall, SimLab 12.0 can provide a 30 per cent improvement in meshing and substantial improvements in setting up large finite element models.

OptiStruct’s solver aids the development of innovative, lightweight and structurally efficient designs by analysing and optimising strength, durability and noise/vibration/harshness (NVH) performance.

These tools are supplemented by HyperWorks solutions such as HyperMesh for shell and simple solid meshing and setup; morph mesh for rapid design iteration and optimisation; AcuSolve for thermal and computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD); the Radioss solver for crash impact; and HyperView for viewing results contours, animations and plotting, as well as advanced NVH diagnostics.

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