PRESS RELEASE

LIMS-on-Demand

Thermo Fisher Scientific has launched LIMS-on-Demand, its software-as-a-service (SaaS), enterprise-class laboratory information management system. It allows organisations of varying types and sizes to leverage all the benefits of an industry-leading LIMS solution without the time and cost typically associated with on-premise software installation.

LIMS-on-Demand can significantly reduce the capital investment associated with traditional LIMS implementation and validation by eliminating the need for extensive software testing and installation. On-demand access provides a more flexible alternative to conventional LIMS so organisations can more easily and cost-effectively adapt technology as needs change. For the cost of a monthly subscription fee, a laboratory can easily, affordably and securely access a fully-functional, validated solution through a standard web browser.

The intuitive web interface enables connectivity with a variety of internal instruments and systems as well as external facilities, partners and regulatory agencies. LIMS-on-Demand offers flexibility and ease-of-use, helping organisations replace inefficient, error-prone manual processes with an automated data management solution. Customers can create workflows, map sample lifecycles and generate automatic updates while providing users with rapid access to up-to-the-minute data and information that impacts every phase of laboratory processes.

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