PRESS RELEASE

ICC updates Vega servers with latest Intel Broadwell-E microarchitecture

International Computer Concepts (ICC), an integrator of enterprise computing solutions, has announced its update to the ICC Vega line of high-frequency trading servers with the latest Broadwell-E microarchitecture from Intel. After extensive testing, the Vega servers featuring overclocked Intel Core i7 processors are ready to ship to customers.

The flagship processor of the Broadwell-E line, the Intel Core i7 6950X, features two extra cores beyond what the Haswell-E delivered for a total of 10 cores. The Cache has also been expanded with this processor, bringing it up by 5MB for a total of 25MB of L3 cache. The Turbo Max 3.0 feature is purported to improve clock speed regulation by up to 15 per cent.

‘The fourth generation of ICC Vega servers will take advantage of the many innovations that the Broadwell-E microarchitecture has over its predecessor, Haswell-E, and ICC is glad to pass these benefits on to its customers,’ noted ICC’s Director of Development Alexey Stolyar. ‘With overclocked speeds of up to 4.4 GHz on the Broadwell-E architecture, that would be an equivalent of up to 4.7 GHz in Haswell-E terms.’

The ICC overclocked servers utilising the latest Broadwell-E microarchitecture include:

ICC R-118i v4 Vega Server

Form Factor: 1U

Processor: 1x Intel 10-core Broadwell-E Core i7 6950X – LGA2011

Speed: 3.0 GHz (original) and 4.4 GHz (overclocked)

Memory: 8 DIMMs, up to 128 GB, DDR4 2400-3200 MHz

ICC R-218i v4 Vega Server

Form Factor: 2U

Processor: 1x Intel 10-core Broadwell-E Core i7 6950X – LGA2011

Speed: 3.0 GHz (original) and 4.4 GHz (overclocked)

Memory: 8 DIMMs, up to 128 GB, DDR4 2400-3200 MHz

Fourth-generation ICC Vega high-frequency trading servers are shipping now. The high-frequency trading market relies greatly on the fastest sequential processing possible, and the updated ICC Vega line will enable our customers to continue outpacing their competition with the fastest 1U server in the world, also a part of the Vega portfolio.

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