PRESS RELEASE

BioBook

IDBS has launched the BioBook, designed to meet the specific needs of research biology. BioBook brings the full benefits of electronic experiment and data management to this crucial, but previously neglected area. In a single secure environment, BioBook allows scientists to manage the entire lifecycle of complex biological experiments and studies. From set-up and data capture, through analysis and graphing, to report creation, sign-off and publication; all data can be easily and securely recorded in a 21 CFR Part 11 compliant environment.

‘While all the attention has been on early-stage discovery, we identified an urgent need for managing data from later stage programmes where a small number of high value candidates are screened for efficacy, ADME, safety and toxicological properties,’ said Neil Kipling, chairman and CEO of IDBS. ‘The complex nature of this work demanded a radical new approach to experimental data capture and management to enable real-time data sharing, analysis and rapid delivery of reports.’

By reducing the number of disparate systems, such as paper lab notebooks and data visualisation and statistical analysis applications, BioBook enhances productivity, reduces data transcription errors and protects corporate IP. BioBook is part of the IDBS EWorkBook suite of applications designed to meet today’s research challenges.

Company: 
Feature

Gemma Church finds out how astronomers are using simulations to investigate the extremities of our universe

Feature

Turning data into scientific insight is not a straightforward matter, writes Sophia Ktori

Feature

The Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) is driving the development of new energy-efficient practices for HPC, as Robert Roe discovers

Feature

William Payne investigates the growing trend of using modular HPC, built on industry standard hardware and software, to support users across a range of both existing and emerging application areas

Feature

Robert Roe looks at developments in crash testing simulation – including larger, more intricate simulations, the use of optimisation software, and the development of new methodologies through collaboration between ISVs, commercial companies, and research organisations