PRESS RELEASE

vSMP Foundation Standalone software

ScaleMP, a provider of virtualisation solutions for high-end computing, has expanded its vSMP Foundation Standalone software product line to support the Supermicro SuperBlade server platform. Using its virtualisation technology, ScaleMP enables the aggregation of up to 10 Intel dual-processor blades to build a high-end shared memory symmetric multiprocessor (SMP). Customers will benefit from 80 Intel Xeons processing 80 cores and up to 640Gb of memory, providing a dense high-end x86 system.

The vSMP Foundation Standalone platform provides a memory resource with up to 1Tb of memory, a shared memory coupled with up to 128 cores, and aggregates multiple cluster nodes into a single system allowing ease of use and a low total cost of ownership for high-performance computing applications.

The SuperBlade from Supermicro provides enhanced system density in a 7U chassis, is supplied with an integrated InfiniBand switch, and can be housed in a 19-inch industry-standard rack, reducing the server footprint in the data centre. Power, cooling and networking devices are aggregated in the rear of the chassis, which optimises space and power. The SuperBlade chassis also greatly simplifies the cabling process by aggregating cabling of ten 1U servers, and also reduces troubleshooting issues by presenting fewer physical connections to the servers. In addition, each blade module is fully upgradeable to for future CPUs.

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