PRESS RELEASE

SmartCluster M Series

Boston Limited has launched its latest generation of Microsoft HPC Server 2008 R2-based SmartCluster M Series portable blade solutions. Based on Microsoft’s Windows HPC software, these clustered solutions include all the hardware, software and networking to be deployed easily, and can provide a network with consistent low-latency performance.

Based on Supermicro Blade storage and networking hardware, SmartCluster provides a complete validated clustered hardware and software solution housed into a small 14U high cabinet with wheels. Included are 160 Intel Xeon 5600 processor cores within 20 compute nodes, 240Gb of memory, 20Tbytes front-end storage node, Mellanox QDR 40Gbps InfiniBand HCA, and Supermicro 36 port QDR InfiniBand switch.

Built on Windows Server 2008 R2 64-bit technology, WindowsHPC Server 2008 R2 Suite is designed as a complete integrated platform for cluster-based computing. SmartCluster M Series platforms arrive with Windows Server (Windows Server 2008 HPC Edition) and Microsoft’s HPC Pack, which comprises a complete integrated set of tools for running high-performance compute clusters.

Key features also include high-speed networking, efficient and scalable cluster management tools, advanced fail over capabilities, Excel as a services orientated architecture (SOA) job scheduler and support for partners clustered file systems. In addition, users can expand the capacity of HPC clusters by adding computers running Windows 7 as low cost workstation nodes.

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