PRESS RELEASE

Singula (update)

Integrated Engineering Software has released further updates to its Singula electromagnetic simulator tool, meaning it can now simulate large phased array antennas.

Singula is an easy-to-use 3D full-wave electromagnetic simulator based on Combined Field Integral Equation (CFIE). It is ideal for high frequency applications such as conductors, power bus structures, microwave circuits and now large phased array antennas.

Until recently, large phased array antennas were extremely complicated to computer simulate. Considering the mutual coupling between any two elements of the array, estimating the radiation characteristics of the large arrays leads to very complex model. Integrated solved this by using the parallel processing Moment of Method solution with the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique. Large phased array antennas can be used for electronic steering of beams. These antennas are used in wide variety of applications including the aerospace and defence industries, satellite communication, remote sensing and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR).

Singula uses the Boundary Element method coupled with Physical Optics (PO) and the FFT method to speed up the matrix-vector multiplication. Singula calculates near and far field results, power and directive gain, radar cross-section, axial ratio, and input impedance, admittance and scattering parameters. Powerful parametric solvers allow designers to automatically vary and experiment with geometry, materials and sources - reducing the tedious, repetitive task of fine-tuning multiple design parameters.

Feature

For functionality and security for externalised research, software providers have turned to the cloud, writes Sophia Ktori

Feature

Robert Roe looks at the latest simulation techniques used in the design of industrial and commercial vehicles

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the growth in cloud technology which is being driven by scientific, engineering and HPC workflows through application specific hardware

Feature

Robert Roe learns that the NASA advanced supercomputing division (NAS) is optimising energy efficiency and water usage to maximise the facility’s potential to deliver computing services to its user community

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the use of technologies in HPC that could help shape the design of future supercomputers