PRESS RELEASE

OmicsHub Proteomics 2.0

Integromics has announced the availability of OmicsHub Proteomics 2.0, a new version of the OmicsHub product adding several new features to its existing centralised data management and analysis capabilities for mass spectrometry laboratories and core facilities. New features include protein quantification, protein validation, a pathway viewer, automatic reports, an OMSSA search engine, background importation and user roles and permissions.

The web-based, multi-user OmicsHub platform enables users to address the poor reliability and human error issues, and time and data management complexity, associated with mass spectrometry experiments. It addresses the problems that such laboratories and core facilities encounter on a daily basis by performing automatic tasks such as batch searches on multiple search engines (Mascot, Phenyx, OMSSA), label-free protein quantification, protein validation and functional annotation (UniProt, InterPro, GO, Panther, etc.), pathways integration or automated report generation. This results in reduced errors, time and data management complexity.

OmicsHub Proteomics is the first product available on the market that allows mass spectrometry researchers to create experiments in a PRIDE XML format for tandem MS based experiments (MS/MS) as well as for peptide mass fingerprinting experiments (MS) or combine experiments (MS+MS/MS).

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