PRESS RELEASE

Maple Global Optimization Toolbox

Maplesoft has announced a new release of the Maple Global Optimization Toolbox, for solving a wide variety of optimisation problems in mathematics, engineering, and the sciences.

For this release, Maplesoft has partnered with Noesis Solutions to develop a new version of the Maple Global Optimization Toolbox, powered by Optimus technology. Optimus, from Noesis Solutions, is a platform for simulation process integration and design optimisation.

The objective of global optimisation is to find the best possible solution in models that have a number of sub-optimal local solutions that meet the requirements but are not the best possible answer. Such problems can be very difficult to solve, and so engineers and researchers are often forced to settle for sub-optimal solutions. The result can be inferior designs and operations, and related expenses in terms of reliability, time, money, and other resources.

Maplesoft says the Maple Global Optimization Toolbox provides a powerful set of global solvers that find the best possible solution to the problem, so compromises do not need to be made.

It features new solver methods and many more options that allow customers to guide the search for the solution based on their knowledge of the particular problem. For example, customers can select different methods for locating promising new points in the design space or control the balance between computation speed and probability of success. Using these new methods and options, customers can reach their solutions faster and solve more problems than ever before, the company says.

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