PRESS RELEASE

Image-Pro Premier

A new image processing and analysis software package that incorporates more than 25 years of user input is now available, Media Cybernetics has announced. Image-Pro Premier is an expansion of the company’s earlier Image-Pro software packages, which are used for applications including life science research, quality control, industrial inspection, and forensic and physical sciences. The latest package provides intuitive tools that make it easier to capture, process, enhance, measure, compare, analyse, automate and share images and data.

In addition to being able to utilise the memory (RAM) available on the host computer, Image-Pro Premier can stream multi-gigabyte movies directly to the hard drive. Batch Processing tools mean that image processing steps can be applied to all opened images or entire folders of images , while the Smart Segmentation tool can identify and segment challenging images that have faintly coloured objects, textured objects and uneven backgrounds. Multi-resolution files, including Aperio (.svs) and BigTIFF (.btf), are supported.

‘New Image-Pro Premier features a highly-intuitive user interface as well as a wide range of advanced analysis tools simply not found in other imaging software packages,’ commented Kathy Hrach, product manager at Media Cybernetics. ‘Premier offers both 64- and 32-bit support, intuitive macros and app building tools, new and improved ways to automatically segment, classify and measure objects, and an extensive set of easy-to-use tools for customising workflow.’

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