PRESS RELEASE

Heat Flow

Morgan Advanced Materials (Morgan) has launched Heat Flow, an online steady-state heat transfer calculator. The Heat Flow application allows users to simulate an unlimited number of heat transfer scenarios using Morgan’s market leading insulation and refractory products, as well as other user-defined materials.

The Heat Flow application comes pre-loaded with nearly 400 products in ten categories offered by Morgan’s Thermal Ceramics business. Users will also have the ability to add other materials into a unique user-defined database to run calculations. The heat transfer calculations use the ASTM C680 formulas with the latest 2010 revision, the international standard for estimating heat loss and surface temperatures, recognised by the mechanical and thermal engineering communities. In planned developments, the company will extend the service to other geographic regions over the coming months.

The new web-based Heat Flow application is compatible with most computer operating systems and web browsers. The material database will be regularly updated so users will always have immediate access to the latest information available.

The program allows users to save favorites and view or edit previous calculations; individual calculations can also be downloaded in PDF format. Mobile applications for smart phones and tablets are available on iTunes and The Google Play Store.

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