PRESS RELEASE

Compute Manager 12.0

Altair Engineering has released Compute Manager 12.0, a faster version of its software for running, monitoring, and managing workloads and results on distributed resources in high-performance computing environments.

Compute Manager is a Web-based job portal that serves as a simple but powerful interface for submitting and monitoring jobs in PBS Professional complexes. Compute Manager automates job submission tasks, bridging the gaps between users and their distributed applications, so users only need to focus on the data and applications they wish to run without concern for any of the associated technical complexities. In addition, it enables users to browse and modify remote files while minimising the need to write, modify and test complex application scripts.

Compute Manager 12.0 runs one-and-a-half times faster than previous versions. A single instance of the software can handle more than 100 concurrent users and up to 500,000 jobs. It is capable of scaling beyond 500 concurrent users through new load-balancing support that enables a highly redundant and highly scalable configuration. The latest version of Compute Manager also incorporates a new version of the Access Management Service, an easy-to-use graphical interface that allows specification of which individuals and/or groups can access various applications and which users may share application profiles.

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