PRESS RELEASE

ActivityBase Xtended Edition

IDBS has launched ActivityBase Xtended Edition (ActivityBase XE) v7.0, with improved drug screening capabilites. The new release includes support for complex assay types (e.g. multiplexing and HCS), extending ActivityBase XE’s applicability across the discovery process.

The new release offers screening scientists a single environment for data capture, visualisation, verification, quality control and storage to identify and fix potential issues in the data in a quick and efficient manner. Presenting screening data in a contextually rich environment helps support decision making and linking analysis templates to experimental conditions greatly reduces the time needed for maintenance. Suspect data detection provides a transparent and comprehensive means of identifying systematic errors with a screening run. ActivityBase XE’s open architecture enables the user to write their own error detection algorithms, as well as the integration of in-house visualisations, fit models and mathematic formulae.

Using the new multiple curve fitting functionality and visualisation tools in the ActivityBase suite, researchers can view data from many different perspectives. By creating a more complete view of the data, ActivityBase XE allows users to identify patterns and trends in results that may not have otherwise been visible.

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