NEWS

Altair acquires CANDI Controls

Altair has announced the acquisition of the intellectual property assets of California-based CANDI Controls and hired CANDI’s experienced software and technology team into Altair’s IoT organisation to strengthen and expand the scope of its Carriots software.

‘Altair’s vision is for digital twin simulation and predictive/prescriptive analytics solutions to run in the cloud or on edge gateway computers to optimise performance of both industrial equipment and consumer devices,’ said James Scapa, founder, chairman, and CEO at Altair. ‘We believe this acquisition is important to help our customers’ digital transformation and enable their products to thrive in today’s rapidly emerging connected ecosystems of smart devices.’

Founded in 2009 with significant start-up capital, CANDI developed a modern platform which supports multiple data protocols for edge gateway computers to communicate with a constellation of IoT devices. CANDI also developed several relationships with important players in the IoT market including Google, Microsoft, and Intel.

CANDI’s software is designed to easily connect systems and equipment with cloud-based monitoring and control services to help organizations improve performance, conserve resources, and cut operational costs. Sensor data can be analyzed, visualized, and processed with machine learning and predictive analytics tools to forecast performance and prescribe actions consistent with business objectives.

Company: 
Twitter icon
Google icon
Del.icio.us icon
Digg icon
LinkedIn icon
Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Feature

Robert Roe looks at the changing ways that the HPC industry uses cloud computing technology

Feature

Robert Roe reports on new technology and 30 years of the US supercomputing conference at SC18 in Dallas

Feature

Sophia Ktori completes her two-part series on the use of artificial intelligence in healthcare research

Feature

Robert Roe reports on developments in multiphysics simulation at the Global Altair Technology Conference

Feature

Gemma Church reveals how simulation and modelling are aiding the design and development of a range of medical devices