PRESS RELEASE

Viridis update

The development tools from the parallel software tools experts, Allinea Software, are now available on the Boston ARM-based server platform, it has been announced. The Boston Viridis servers are based on the low power Calxeda EnergyCore ECX-1000 SoC, with quad-core ARM A9 Cortex CPUs and fabric interconnect. With each 2U chassis packing up to 48 servers, customers can populate more than 1,000 servers per rack, all interconnected via a high bandwidth low latency interconnect.

The Allinea DDT debugger and Allinea MAP performance profiler are extremely scalable parallel development tools that enable more efficient use of resources, while reducing the complexity and risk of software development. Developers can resolve software defects quickly using Allinea DDT, and tackle any performance bottlenecks discovered during the scale out to multiple servers with Allinea MAP.

‘This represents a vital enabling step for our customers,’ said David Power, head of HPC at Boston, ‘The availability of tools for this platform makes porting, debugging, and profiling a more efficient process. The tools are very well known and respected throughout the HPC community and having them ported to our platform will mean users not only have a familiar development environment, but also access to one of the most scalable debuggers and profilers in the industry. It’s yet another migration from the x86 barrier addressed!’

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