PRESS RELEASE

TotalView Software within SGI Development Suite

The TotalView Team application verification, optimisation and debugging software from Rogue Wave Software is now available as part of the SGI Development Suite software development environment. TotalView Team is used by developers tasked with developing complex applications for deployment on supercomputers. The package includes TotalView, MemoryScape, and ThreadSpotter – with ReplayEngine and Cuda support as available options. The suite provides developers with a combination of tools to pinpoint and fix hard to reproduce bugs, memory utilisation problems, race conditions, and performance issues relating to cache utilisation and thread interaction.

SGI Development Suite provides an environment for developing, debugging, and performance analysis of high-performance technical computing applications for the Linux operating system. The suite consists of SGI Performance Suite technical computing libraries and tools; Intel Parallel Studio XE high-performance compilers, libraries and analysis tools; and Rogue Wave TotalView Team advanced code and memory analysis and debugging tools. Rogue Wave Software and SGI have collaborated to enable TotalView to debug scalable, parallel applications using SGI Performance Suite’s SGI Message Passing Toolkit MPI library.

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