PRESS RELEASE

Professor Cristina Nevado joins Science of Synthesis

Professor Cristina Nevado of the University of Zürich’s Chemistry Institute, has joined the Science of Synthesis (SOS) Editorial Board with immediate effect. Science of Synthesis, a continually updated chemical reference resource, presents chemists from all sectors, including industry as well as research institutes and universities, with established and proven synthetic methods for a comprehensive range of compound classes. Professor Cristina Nevado brings her expertise in the synthesis of complex natural products and catalysis to her new role.

‘With Cristina Nevado we have a leading scientist of the younger generation joining the board of editors,’ says Professor Alois Fürstner, director at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Mülheim on Ruhr, and Editor-in-Chief of Science of Synthesis. ‘Her expertise ranges from contemporary catalysis research to natural product synthesis, putting her in an ideal position to help SOS fulfil its mission as the most reliable source of information covering organic synthesis in its entire breadth,’ adds Professor Fürstner.

Professor Cristina Nevado received her Master’s degree in organic chemistry and her PhD from the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid. She then accepted a post-doctoral fellowship at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung at Mülheim on Ruhr, where she worked with Professor Fürstner on the total synthesis of bioactive marine macrolides.

Since 2007, Professor Nevado and her research group at the University of Zürich have been focusing on the biological evaluation of natural products occurring exclusively in maritime environments, including defensive toxins found in algae and corals. Very often, these substances can be isolated only in minuscule quantities from natural sources. The group’s research goal is to develop new methods for the synthesis of such compounds, in order to make them available for the development of new drugs where they may be able to influence and mitigate inflammation and even cancer progression and metastasis. Furthermore, Professor Nevado and her team are developing new reactions that make use of the catalytic properties of transition metals to promote various bond formations. Professor Nevado’s projects are funded with support from a European Research Council Young Investigators Grant.

Professor Nevado has received multiple awards for her research in organic chemistry. In addition to the Werner Prize of the Swiss Chemical Society, she has been awarded the Emerging Investigator Award of the Royal Society of Chemistry as well as the Thieme Chemistry Journal Award.

From July 2018, Professor Nevado joins the international Science of Synthesis Editorial Board, the nine members of which work closely together with the Thieme SOS editorial team to continuously develop the reference work. Chemists in all sectors, including industry as well as research institutions and universities, rely on Science of Synthesis, which is available as an interactive online platform with text and structure search functionalities and as a print work.  

To learn more about the Science of Synthesis, please visit www.thieme-chemistry.com/sos/. Free trials of the online version (14-days) are available upon request. https://sos.thieme.com

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