PRESS RELEASE

OpenNebula 3.4

OpenNebula has announced the release of a stable version of its widely-deployed open-source management solution for enterprise data centre virtualisation.

The company says OpenNebula 3.4 delivers the most feature-rich, customisable solution to build enterprise virtualised data centers and private clouds on Xen, KVM and VMware, providing cloud consumers with a choice of interfaces, from open cloud to de-facto standards, like the Amazon API.

This new release incorporates contributions from many members of its large user community, including Research in Motion, Logica, Terradue 2.0 and CloudWeavers, and from research and academia, especially Clemson and Vilnius Universities.

OpenNebula 3.4 focuses on extending its storage capabilities with the support for multiple datastores to offer flexible, scalable and high-performance storage backends. OpenNebula 3.4 also features improvements in other systems, like support for resource pools, elastic IPs in the Amazon API, improved web GUIs and better support for hybrid clouds with Amazon EC2. 

'While being hypervisor-agnostic, this new update of OpenNebula has functionality comparable to VMware vCenter and vCloud Director,' said Ruben S. Montero, chief architect of OpenNebula.

OpenNebula is a very active open source project that started five years ago and has developed a large user base, with more than 5,000 downloads per month and thousands of deployments.

Company: 
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