PRESS RELEASE

Moab+CMU

Cluster Resources' Moab workload management solution is now compatible with HP Cluster Management Utility (CMU) software, a tool for managing Linux-based nodes in HPC clusters.

This joint solution brings added integration and optimisation to HPC and satisfies the market need for a more flexible computing platform that adapts, self‐optimises, and delivers resources on demand to meet both the current and future needs of organizations.

Moab+CMU provides automated operating-system installation onto HP hardware to improve cluster efficiency. This solution dynamically changes a cluster's active version of Linux and installs a different version of Linux on cluster servers based on workload, defined policies, and application needs for both initial deployments and updates.

Moab currently works with other HP enterprise provisioning tools such as HP Operations Orchestration, HP Server Automation, and HP Service Manager to provide the most advanced cloud and adaptive data center management available. On the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) supercomputer, these provisioning tools report resource availability, system failures, customer needs, and other critical events to Moab. Moab then intelligently adapts, manages, and optimises the cloud computing resources in this highly complex environment.

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