PRESS RELEASE

Matrix Gemini LIMS chosen by The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre Biobank

A  new case study has been published by Autoscribe Informatics which describes how the newly established Biobank is using the Matrix Gemini Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for complete tracking of all of its samples. The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre Biobank is part of a multi-million pound project to transform cancer care in Merseyside, UK. 

The CCC Biobank will act as a major resource for academic oncologists and help build further links between The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Liverpool University and key research partners. It has been established to provide biological samples linked to patient outcome data to facilitate good quality research into the molecular mechanisms of cancer. 

Samples need to be tracked at all times and it is essential to be able to record the complete genealogy for all samples and track aliquots, pooled samples and derivatives of each sample, right the way through each use for research to complete sample consumption or final disposal. The Matrix Gemini LIMS meets these critical requirements by allowing the recording and auditing of every action associated with the samples. In addition, the built-in configuration tools provide the flexibility to accommodate any future changes, for example if sample collection from multiple centres is introduced. 

John Boother, President of Autoscribe Informatics said: ‘We are delighted that Matrix Gemini was chosen to be used in such a major initiative. Matrix Gemini has a proven track record with other biobanks in the city and with the Liverpool GCLP facility which collects, stores and analyses samples from clinical trials, so we were able to work closely with CCC to ensure that their user requirements were exactly met.’ 

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