PRESS RELEASE

Mathcad Prime 2.0

Available from Adept Scientific, the latest version of PTC’s Mathcad Prime engineering calculation software adds new calculation features and advanced capabilities. Enhancements that improve the personal and engineering process productivity benefits currently offered by the Mathcad product family include symbolic algebra; automation of the process of explicit derivation to manipulate complex equations, reduce errors and improving efficiency; computational improvements, such as faster performance, 64-bit support, optimisation solver and multi-threading; and 3D plots.

Furthermore, the integration of Mathcad and Excel enables users to access and utilise data from existing spread sheets and eliminates the need to convert data when introducing Mathcad. Users are also able to better manage content and have more control over their workspace by collapsing (placing out of view) details that are not essential at the moment. Limitations of data-set size can be removed, enabling more exploration to be done in the concept phase, and more design approaches can be evaluated with higher confidence, reducing errors and problems that occur later in detailed design.

Mathcad Prime 2.0 is supplied and supported in the UK, Ireland, Germany, Austria and the Nordic countries by Adept Scientific.  

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