PRESS RELEASE

MapleSim 2 and Maple 13

Maplesoft has released updated versions of its core products – MapleSim, the high-performance, multi-domain modelling and simulation tool, and Maple, the technical computing software for engineers, mathematicians, and scientists.

MapleSim 2 combines an intuitive physical modelling environment with powerful symbolic techniques to reduce the time and effort required to create highly efficient models. The release introduces 3D visualisation and animation tools that easily transform multibody models into realistic animations, providing greater insight into the system behaviour. It also provides tools for managing results from multiple simulations, simplifying a notoriously tedious and confusing task.

Maple 13 provides enhanced tools that support every stage of the solution development process, new 3D plotting facilities, and leading-edge solvers. It offers a convenient starting point for engineering calculations with the Maple Portal for Engineers, point-and-click access to powerful control systems analysis tools, and expanded CAD connectivity that adds NX to the list of supported CAD systems. New plotting facilities include extensive annotation tools and fly-through animations, making 3D plots more meaningful and easier to interpret. Maple 13's leading-edge solvers expand the problem-solving abilities of engineers. They include techniques for finding solutions to differential equations that are beyond the scope of standard methods.

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