PRESS RELEASE

LabView 2010

National Instruments has introduced LabView 2010, the latest version of the graphical programming environment for design, test, measurement and control applications. LabView 2010 delivers new features such as off-the-shelf compiler technologies that execute code an average of 20 per cent faster, and a comprehensive marketplace for evaluating and purchasing add-on toolkits for easily integrating custom functionality into the platform. For field-programmable gate array (FPGA) users, LabView 2010 delivers a new IP Integration Node that makes it possible to integrate any third-party FPGA IP into LabView applications and is compatible with the Xilinx Core Generator. National Instruments also implemented more than a dozen new features suggested by lead users through the LabView Idea Exchange, an online feedback forum that marks a significant new level of collaboration between NI R&D and customers.

Introduced in 1986, LabView abstracts the complexity of programming by giving users drag-and-drop, graphical function blocks and wires that resemble a flowchart to develop their sophisticated systems. LabView offers integration with thousands of hardware devices, provides hundreds of built-in libraries for advanced analysis and data visualisation and is scalable across multiple OSs and targets such as x86 processors, real-time OSs (RTOSs) and FPGAs.

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