PRESS RELEASE

Integration of Tibco Spotfire Analytics Platform with ChemAxon's Instant JChem

Tibco Software and ChemAxon, a provider of chemical software development platforms and desktop applications for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, have announced the full integration of the Tibco Spotfire Analytics Platform with ChemAxon's Instant JChem data management application. Through this integration, new levels of visualisation, analysis and exploration will be available to the life science community.

Designed specifically for end users, Instant JChem is ChemAxon's desktop chemistry solution that allows scientists to manage and search chemical structures and related information. Through JChem, users can create, explore and share chemical and non-chemical data stored in local and remote databases. With this integration, Instant JChem's data generation and management capabilities are now fully exposed to the Tibco Spotfire Analytics Platform, bringing new levels of chemical search, analysis and visualisation capabilities in order to speed and refine the analytic process.

Using Tibco Spotfire, chemists can evaluate an ever-increasing amount of data derived from screening, ADME and chemistry research efforts focusing on compound series. This allows them to take full advantage of the information to make the best decisions regarding the prioritisation of which compounds to synthesise. The platform easily accommodates new information and allows chemists to spot trends in complex datasets through the use of multiple linking visualisations and chemical structure viewing.

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