PRESS RELEASE

IncrediBuild supports Nvidia compiler

IncrediBuild, the code build acceleration solution, now supports the Nvidia Cuda compiler to make software code development faster.

IncrediBuild accelerates code builds, code analyses, QA scripts and other development tools by up to 30 times. Reduced development time translates into hundreds of thousands of dollars per year.

'With the ever-increasing competition to deliver apps for all devices, faster time to market is a critical competitive edge,' said Eyal Maor, CEO of IncrediBuild. 'IncrediBuild support for the Cuda compiler leverages the performance-focused aspects of both technologies.'

IncrediBuild aims to allow the user to shorten application development time and continuous integration processes for Cuda-based development. IncrediBuild splits processing among machines and CPU processor cores, maximising use of every machine involved in compiling the application.

'We build our GPUs to handle the most complex, compute-intensive parallel processing requirements,' said Ian Buck, general manager of GPU computing software at Nvidia.

'With IncrediBuild technology, Cuda developers can now easily take advantage of IncrediBuild to dramatically reduce the amount of time they spend developing GPU-accelerated applications.'

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