PRESS RELEASE

Grams 9.1

Thermo Fisher Scientific has released version 9.1 of its Grams software for visualising, processing, reporting and managing spectroscopy data. The Grams Suite is comprised of a collection of complementary and fully-integrated applications and modules centred on the core Grams/AI spectroscopy data processing and reporting software.

In addition to advanced processing routines, data comparison and visualisation features, the solution can handle data from any analytical instrument. New functionality available with version 9.1 offers intuitive and simplified workflows to enable scientists engaged in a variety of spectroscopic experiments and disciplines to more easily and rapidly access their data and make more informed decisions about the results generated.  

Further features include Grams IQ, the next-generation solution for visual chemometric modelling that delivers simplified visual workflow and model deployment capabilities for quantitative and qualitative analyses, and Grams Convert, an application that enables users to automatically find and transform all of the spectra on a hard drive to a standard format. Grams 9.1 is supported on Microsoft Windows 7, 32- and 64-bit Operating Systems and adds compatibility with more than 30 new instrument data formats. By using interactive import wizard, Smart Convert/Import, data from more than 180 types of IR, UV-Vis, NMR and LC/GC-MS instruments can also be managed.    

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