PRESS RELEASE

ForgeV10.1

Cresset has announced the release of the first major update to its computational chemistry workbench, ForgeV10, since its launch in 2012. ForgeV10.1 offers enhanced capabilities for viewing molecules in 3D, flexible handling of multiple reference molecules giving improved results during analysis of structure activity relationships, and the ability to download protein crystal structure files and rapidly split them into protein and ligand.

‘ForgeV10 has been an instant hit with our customers. They use it for gaining deep insights into structure activity relationships, for virtual screening on desktop hardware and to develop detailed pharmacophores for the design of compounds and compound libraries,’ said Dr Tim Cheeseright, Cresset’s director of products.

‘We have had many customer requests for new features, particularly for more control over how molecules are compared. We have listened carefully to our customers and are proud to introduce significant scientific enhancements in ForgeV10.1, as well as streamlining the design of new compounds and interpretation of complex SAR,’ he added.

Company: 
Feature

For functionality and security for externalised research, software providers have turned to the cloud, writes Sophia Ktori

Feature

Robert Roe looks at the latest simulation techniques used in the design of industrial and commercial vehicles

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the growth in cloud technology which is being driven by scientific, engineering and HPC workflows through application specific hardware

Feature

Robert Roe learns that the NASA advanced supercomputing division (NAS) is optimising energy efficiency and water usage to maximise the facility’s potential to deliver computing services to its user community

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the use of technologies in HPC that could help shape the design of future supercomputers