PRESS RELEASE

Dissolution Workstation Software

Agilent Technologies has introduced an enhanced version of its Dissolution Workstation Software, providing better data integration, method change control and instrument monitoring for controlling multiple dissolution systems. Dissolution is a technique used in the pharmaceutical industry to determine the rate at which pure active pharmaceutical ingredients dissolve.

The software supports laboratory capabilities to build, edit, search, retrieve, execute, and archive all dissolution methods and test reports from a single interface. The new features allow users to consolidate and maintain electronic data in one location, with options for exporting information into a laboratory information management system or into business tools such as SAP Crystal Reports or Microsoft Excel. Users can also monitor the dissolution apparatus for vibration, environmental impacts and failure investigation assistance when using the optional Instrument Module, as well as comply with the latest enhanced mechanical qualification guidelines, including verifying accessories prior to each test.

Dissolution Workstation Software organises, executes and manages methods and information for all Agilent dissolution equipment, including the Agilent 708-DS, 709-DS, BIO-DIS, Apparatus 7 and dissolution sampling systems. Continuous audit trails provide reliable traceability of methods and system operation, and reduce the time required to manually document information.

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