PRESS RELEASE

ChemBioOffice Ultra 13.0 Suite

Version 13.0 of the ChemBioOffice Informatics Suite has been released by PerkinElmer. With improvements to the ChemBioDraw and ChemBio3D modules while providing secure cloud storage for improved data sharing, the suite provides the tools necessary to create publication-ready drawings of compounds, reactions, materials and their properties for use in electronic laboratory notebooks (ELNs) and databases, as well as for querying chemical databases.

The improved biopolymer toolbar of the ChemBioDraw program enables quick and easy modifications to larger therapeutic agents and molecular structures such as amino acids, peptides, RNA, DNA and nucleotides. In addition, users can now copy and paste any sequence into the program to manipulate part or the entire section of a sequence in the search for modifications to gain a deeper understanding of their results and correlate biological activity with chemical structures.  

To assess the shape and properties of small molecules and biochemical compounds, the ChemBio3D program enables synthetic chemists and biologists to generate 3D models. The ChemBio3D program can evaluate data input and provide information such as the degree of fit of compounds into a receptor. The program also acts as a hub for other 3D modelling programs.

Free, two-week versions of ChemBioOffice Ultra 13.0 and ChemBioDraw are available to download here.

 

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