PRESS RELEASE

cellSens Dimension Count and Measure Solution module

Olympus has announced the release of its Count and Measure Solution module for the cellSens Dimension software suite. The new module helps users design and automate image analysis protocols by providing advanced object detection and structure differentiation. This maximises accuracy and reproducibility while minimising the time needed for manual image processing. The system can be configured to recognise objects and structures based on user specifications by employing a range of threshold-based methods, and can perform complex analyses such as those requiring multiple measurements per image.

The new module integrates with the cellSens Dimension platform to supply flexible, automated image analysis. It provides advanced thresholding and spectral unmixing capabilities to facilitate the definition of objects of interest, including automatic, manual, manual Hue Saturation Value (HSV) and adaptive methods. In all cases, the information acquired can be exported to Microsoft Excel as diagrams, graphs or raw data.

Available measurement parameters include area, aspect ratio, bisector, bounding box, gravity centre, ID, mass centre, intensity values, next neighbour distance, orientation, perimeter, and sphericity. Each of these can be combined and used in conjunction with automatic object detection to perform complex data analysis. This makes it possible to generate comprehensive data sets with minimal user input, all within the same processing run.

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