PRESS RELEASE

Caps HMPP compiler

Supplier of manycore programming tools and services, Caps, has announced that its HMPP compiler now supports Microsoft Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 and Visual Studio 2008. Based on GPU programming and tuning directives, HMPP offers an incremental programming model that allows developers with different levels of expertise to fully exploit GPU hardware accelerators in their legacy code.

The newly-announced Windows HPC Server 2008 R2 provides HMPP customers with a familiar environment and rich tool-set that enables developers and HPC professionals to spend less time coping with complex technologies. Windows HPC Server makes it easier to bring the power of technical computing to analysts, engineers and scientists, giving them the computation resources they need to fuel product innovation and accelerate time-to-market.

‘Caps provides valuable solutions for manycore programming. By coupling their products and expertise with Windows HPC Server 2008 R2, CAPS is extending those capabilities to a much broader audience of technical computing users,’ said Bill Hamilton, director of technical computing at Microsoft. ‘Together, we help ensure our joint customers make the most of technical computing power and rapidly advance HPC solutions.’

Company: 
Feature

Gemma Church finds out how astronomers are using simulations to investigate the extremities of our universe

Feature

Turning data into scientific insight is not a straightforward matter, writes Sophia Ktori

Feature

The Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) is driving the development of new energy-efficient practices for HPC, as Robert Roe discovers

Feature

William Payne investigates the growing trend of using modular HPC, built on industry standard hardware and software, to support users across a range of both existing and emerging application areas

Feature

Robert Roe looks at developments in crash testing simulation – including larger, more intricate simulations, the use of optimisation software, and the development of new methodologies through collaboration between ISVs, commercial companies, and research organisations