PRESS RELEASE

ANSYS acquires Computational Engineering International

ANSYS, a provider of engineering simulation software, announced that it has acquired Computational Engineering International, the developer of a suite of products that helps engineers and scientists analyse, visualise and communicate simulation data.

Headquartered in Apex, North Carolina, CEI has 28 employees and more than 750 customers around the world. Its flagship product, EnSight, is the premier solution for analyzing, visualizing and communicating simulation data.

‘CEI has a long track record of success thanks to fantastic technology built by a world-class team,’ said Mark Hindsbo, ANSYS vice president and general manager. ‘By bringing CEI's leading visualization tools into the ANSYS portfolio, customers will be able to make better engineering and business decisions, leading to even more amazing products in the future.’

‘We've worked with ANSYS informally for years, but now are thrilled to become part of this great company,’ said Anders Grimsrud, CEI president. ‘Joining ANSYS will give our customers access to the best engineering simulation technology on the planet, and EnSight will help ANSYS users make faster, smarter decisions. It's a win-win.’

Terms of the deal, which closed earlier this month, were not disclosed.

Company: 
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