PRESS RELEASE

Adaptive Computing partners with Google Cloud

Adaptive Computing Enterprises, a world leader in dynamically optimizing large-scale HPC computing environments, today announced its partnership with Google Cloud, offering dynamic Cloud Bursting to the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) with its Moab/NODUS Cloud Bursting Solution. This is a highly flexible and extendable solution that allows HPC systems to “burst” workloads to the Google Cloud Platform on demand.

The Adaptive/Google Cloud partnership will make HPC Cloud Bursting strategies easily accessible.

Adaptive Computing’s Cloud Bursting Solution will allow supercomputing customers to complete workloads on time by leveraging GCP resources. Moab/NODUS can be customized to satisfy multiple use cases and scenarios. It can run workloads in an on-premise data center and/or in GCP, on bare metal, VMs and Containers, etc.

‘We are delighted to be collaborating with Google and are thrilled about offering our customers access to unlimited HPC compute resources available through Google Cloud,’ said Arthur Allen, CEO of Adaptive Computing. ‘We will be at the Google Cloud booth at ISC in Frankfurt, Germany on June 25- 27, and will give several presentations with demonstrations in the Google theater area.’

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