PRESS RELEASE

ACD/Labs Version 11.0

ACD/Labs Version 11.0 from Advanced Chemistry Development, includes updates to its desktop NMR, mass spectrometry (MS), and optical spectroscopy products.

The new suite includes the ACD/IntelliXtract software for LC/MS componentisation features the new ability to extract chromatographic components according to specific, user-defined isotope patterns, such as radiolabels.

Other MS tools now have the capability to predict negative ion fragmentation, and feature new file formats for LC/MS data importation in support of ACD/Labs vendor-friendly policy that allows users to open and process experimental data from a variety of vendor file formats and instrument types. Processing of chromatographic data and peak matching for LC/UV (PDA, DAD) became simpler with updates to the ACD/Labs' products for LC.

Significant changes have been made to ACD/Labs NMR Processing products (ACD/1D NMR Manager and 1D NMR Processor) to help improve the structure verification workflow that will help users confirm the identity of their structures faster and more reliably.

The new ACD/1D NMR Assistant, designed especially for chemists, features a streamlined user interface, fast and accurate multiplet analysis, and a structure verification algorithm to bring NMR expertise to the chemist's desktop.

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