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Where to find 85 Teraflops of scientific supercomputing power

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CSC has upgraded its Cray supercomputer to more than 85 Teraflops (trillions of floating point operations per second).  

This makes the new Cray XT5 system at the Finnish supercomputer centre CSC the most powerful academic supercomputer in the Nordic countries and one of the fastest supercomputers in Europe. 

Later this year, a second upgrade funded under the EU's Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE) initiative will boost the Cray system's peak performance to 100 Teraflops. PRACE, which already includes 16 nations, enables European scientists and engineers to access world-class high performance computing resources. The 100-Teraflops Cray supercomputer will take one-thousandth of a second to solve a problem that ESKO, the first Finnish academic computer, would have taken 50 years to solve a half century ago. 

Nordic researchers will use the supercomputer to solve scientific and engineering problems in a wide range of fields including turbulence and climate change, energy research, materials science, and gene interactions and medical research. 

'The first upgrade of the Cray supercomputer ensures that Finnish researchers and engineers will continue to have access to world-class computing resources. The second PRACE upgrade confirms CSC's strong position and influence in building European co-operation,' said Kimmo Koski, managing director of CSC. 'This powerful resource strengthens Finland's position as an attractive environment for world-class research.'