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University offers AI education with new MSc

The University of Aberdeen in the UK has announced that it is launching a new master’s degree in Artificial Intelligence. The degree aims to fill the fast growing need for AI-literate workers in a range of industries.

While AI is a broad field, the degree aims to familiarise students with those technologies most sought after in business, covering areas such as big data, analytics, data science, machine learning and AI for decision support.

 Professor Wamberto Vasconcelos, head of the University’s Department of Computing Science, said:

‘This course builds on the department’s world leading research strengths and strong industrial ties. Artificial Intelligence promises to be the next industrial revolution, and such technologies are in great demand worldwide.’

 ‘Given the well-recognised skills shortage in the field, this course offers companies a fresh pool of talent from which to recruit, allowing them to shape their workforce in preparation for the new economy. Our close partnership with the Data Lab and our industrial advisory board will ensure that this new degree is directly relevant to the industry, and will unlock a new stream of talent in the north east added Vasconcelos.

 The University is working in conjunction with, Data Lab, a Scottish government funded project to enable industry, public sector, and university researchers to develop new data science capabilities in a collaborative environment. In conjunction with Scotland’s Data Lab innovation centre, the University is offering six funded places for the course starting in September 2017.

‘Given the well-recognised skills shortage in the field, this course offers companies a fresh pool of talent from which to recruit, allowing them to shape their workforce in preparation for the new economy. Our close partnership with the Data Lab and our industrial advisory board will ensure that this new degree is directly relevant to the industry, and will unlock a new stream of talent in the north east.’

The degree was designed with input from an advisory board including companies such as Intelligent Plant, Arria NLG and public sector bodies including Aberdeen City Council. Students on the course will be taught using a mix of course and project work, solving real world problems relevant to real world organisations.

Steve Aitken, from Intelligent Plant, said: ‘As a growing company who work in this space we know that there is increasing demand for AI related services, and welcome this new degree as a means to help us recruit and address the problems faced by the industry.’

‘This degree should allow graduates to immediately apply their skills upon entering the job market, as well as to undertake industrially relevant work while studying and Intelligent Plant is happy to help the university to ensure that the course is relevant to Industry’ concluded Aitken.

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