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Tohoku University orders Fujitsu supercomputer

Fujitsu has announced that it has received an order for a new HPC system from the Institute of Fluid Science at Tohoku University.

The Supercomputer System will consist of multiple systems using the latest Fujitsu Server PRIMERGY x86 servers, and is planned to deliver a peak theoretical performance in excess of 2.7 petaflops.

The Supercomputer System will be deployed at the Advanced Fluid Information Research Center in the Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture. The system is expected to enter full operation in 2018. The systems will support the Tohoku University Institute of Fluid Science in the advancement of its research in a variety of fields, including biology, energy, aerospace and semiconductor research.

The Institute of Fluid Science at Tohoku University has contributed to the development of fluid science in a variety of fields, including clarifying the flow of blood through the body, and controlling plasma flow in semiconductor manufacturing, using a next-generation integrated research method that unites creative experimental research with supercomputer-based computational research.

Now, the institute is upgrading and significantly improving the performance of its core equipment, The Supercomputer System, in order to further enhance its fluid science research in fields such as health, welfare and medicine, the environment and energy, aerospace and manufacturing.

Fujitsu received the order for this system based on a proposal that combined software-based virtualization technology with a large-scale computational system that utilizes the technology Fujitsu has cultivated through HPC development.

The supercomputer consists of three systems, including two shared-memory parallel computation systems, which can use large capacity memory space, and one distributed-memory parallel computation system, which can execute large-scale parallel programs. It also has a login server and application and remote graphics server, as well as software and a variety of subsystems for tasks such as visualisation and storage. 

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