NEWS

Titian paints Mosaic for Boehringer Ingelheim

Sample management software provider, Titian Software, has announced that Boehringer Ingelheim has implemented its Mosaic sample management software for the inventory management, sample tracking, and sample processing of new biological entities (NBE).

Now well-established as a provider of sample management software for small molecule compound libraries, Titian has evolved Mosaic into enterprise-wide management of biological samples, reagents and standards.

The new installation has Boehringer Ingelheim incorporating Mosaic into their protein purification, gene expression, biological lead engineering, and biological lead generation workflows within the NBE groups.

Titian CEO Edmund Wilson said: 'Drug discovery is now more challenging than ever, and so pharmaceutical, biotech and academic organisations are seeking to maximise the efficiencies of their laboratory processes.

'Knowing where a sample is, what its character make-up is, and what has been done to it and by whom, is an essential element in this efficiency. Mosaic’s success has been built on the premise of listening to the needs of customers in various organisations. Based on this we have developed Mosaic to cover biological applications in addition to our heartland of chemical sample management, for which we are recognised as the ‘go-to’ offering.'

Wilson continued: 'We are delighted to announce this project with Boehringer Ingelheim which reflects Mosaic’s success with the management of biological samples.'

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