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Silicon Mechanics appoints Disney exec Daniel Chow as COO

Silicon Mechanics has announced the appointment of Daniel Chow as Chief Operating Officer. Mr Chow will lead Silicon Mechanics’ project management, business integration, architecture/engineering, and production groups.

Mr Chow has more than 11 years of IT experience as an executive, senior manager, lead UNIX system engineer, lead storage engineer, and storage architect. He has joined Silicon Mechanics from Disney Technology Solutions and Services, where he was Senior Manager of Storage and Compute Services, responsible for Disney’s internal hosting service provider platform.

Mr Chow will be tasked with ensuring the continued quality of Silicon Mechanics’ solutions and products while keeping pace with technology innovations.

‘We have experienced significant volume growth, and Mr Chow’s appointment represents the kind of investment we need to architect, build, support, and deploy the best possible solutions for our customers,’ said Eva Cherry, CEO and President of Silicon Mechanics. ‘His engineering management skills will help us be the kind of partner that customers are seeking when faced with more and more complex data management needs.’

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