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e-Science centres win continued funding

Four UK e-Science Centres have been awarded grants totalling just under £4m to continue developing new e-Science technologies and promote their adoption in academia and industry over the next five years. The centres are:

  • National e-Science Centre (NeSC, based at the universities of Edinburgh and Glasgow);
  • the Belfast e-Science Centre (BeSC, based at Queen's University Belfast);
  • the South-East Regional e-Research Consortium (SEReRC, based at Oxford, Reading and Southampton universities);
  • the White Rose Grid e-Science Centre (based at the universities of Leeds, Sheffield and York). 

The grants have been awarded by the UK e-Science Core Programme, which is funded and managed by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The funding will enable the centres to provide core staff and services to run e-Science research projects and to participate in separately-funded projects that make use of or develop e-Science tools.  

Each centre has already enjoyed considerable success in providing grid and e-Science infrastructure and resources locally and engaging the local research community in projects across a wide range of subject areas to achieve new, better or different research results.

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