NEWS

ChemAxon to take lead on drug discovery

ChemAxon, a provider of chemistry software solutions and consulting services for life science research, and the European Lead Factory, a platform for drug discovery, have announced that ChemAxon will provide the core tools and lead the development of the informatics platform to support the pan-European initiative.

ChemAxon will be building a portal to support the crowd-sourcing initiative using its core JChem Base and Marvin components. The scientific decision process involved in selecting the right proposals from those submitted will be supported by ChemAxon’s Discovery Toolkit, including various fingerprints and physico-chemical property predictors.

The portal will also offer a way for submitters to keep track of their submission’s status and for the consortium’s selection committee to score and analyse submitted proposals.

The Innovative Medicines Initiative (IMI), the world's largest public-private initiative in the field of pharmaceutical research aims to create a new and unique collaboration of public and private sector.

The research programme of up to EUR196 million and named the European Lead Factory, involving small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), academic institutions and large pharmaceutical companies, aims to improve the competitiveness of the European pharmaceutical industry, accelerate the drug development process, and strives to develop safer, more effective drugs.

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