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Cenetron uses Starlims for global clinical trials

Cenetron Diagnostics has implemented the latest version of the Starlims Laboratory Information Management System for global clinical trials.

Starlims serves as an enterprise-wide system to build and track clinical trial collection kits, manage and track specimens, manage laboratory testing workflows, create user-defined laboratory reports and manage study-specific databases.

 The security, data integrity, and audit trail capabilities of Starlims enables Cenetron to meet the stringent requirements of its pharmaceutical clients, including timely reports, data transfers of absolute quality and accuracy, and for full compliance with FDA 21CFR part 11 guidelines.

Dwight DuBois, president of Cenetron, said: ‘We are able to meet and exceed FDA and sponsor requirements with enormous flexibility. Starlims is able to handle complex data sets generated from molecular testing with traceability, accuracy, and clarity.’

DuBois added: ‘Starlims’ scalability and versatility are also important, allowing us to add functionalities as our business grows. Our team is currently completing testing of another module that allows the storage, retrieval, and analysis of DNA sequencing data.’

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