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Cancer research trials turn to LIMS

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The Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation (RCLCF), a UK charity dedicated to the defeat of lung cancer, is using a LIMS solution from Autoscribe to track its samples.

The RCLF funds basic science research, tobacco control initiatives and work in lung cancer patient information, support and advocacy. RCLCF works towards defeating lung cancer through research, campaigning and education and gives practical and emotional support for patients and all those affected by lung cancer and smoking. It also enables children and young people to make informed decisions about smoking and the tobacco industry.

Clinical trial research facilities like RCLCF and computer systems that involve the storage of Human Tissue Samples need to be compliant with the Human Tissue Act (2006). When choosing a LIMS, key issues included the need to comply with current and future regulatory requirements and associated audits. It also needed to improve the method for booking in samples, improve the logging of booked out samples and their usage, and result in a user-friendly system that makes sample editing and auditing easy to use. Its choice of LIMS also needed to be easily configured to meet current and future needs.

The RCLCF opted for the Matrix Gemini LIMS from Autoscribe, which provided the flexibility and adaptability required by the centre.