NEWS
Tags: 

Boston deploys Supermicro MCS storage for big data workloads

Boston has announced it plans to deploy application accelerating SSDs using Memory Channel Storage technology within Supermicro server and storage platforms suited to a broad range of big-data analytical workloads, high-frequency trading, in-memory compute, virtualisation, VDI, and database acceleration.

Powered by Diablo Technologies Memory Channel Storage (MCS), the SSD’s design connects flash storage to the memory channel using an industry standard DIMM form factor, enabling it to be fully interoperable with RDIMM’s.

Boston claims this new technology can achieve up to 5μs write latency, random read/write performance of up to 150K/65K IOPS per DIMM, and data transfer rates up to 1GBps/760MBps sequential read/write performance.

Manoj Nayee, managing director of Boston, said: ‘Customers are demanding more and more performance from their systems. We have developed a certified range of systems that will help deliver this performance to clients in various sectors looking for pure acceleration.’

Wally Liaw, Vice President of Sales, International at Supermicro explained: ‘Supermicro’s MCS tuned Hyper-Speed and Enterprise class platforms dramatically accelerate I/O for mission critical, data intensive applications delivering customers such as Boston an unrivalled performance and reliability advantage for their end-to-end computing solutions.’

Twitter icon
Google icon
Del.icio.us icon
Digg icon
LinkedIn icon
Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Analysis and opinion
Feature

Robert Roe investigates some of the European projects focusing on preparing today’s supercomputers and HPC programmers for exascale HPC

Feature

The Jülich Supercomputing Centre (JSC) at Forschungszentrum Jülich in Germany has been operating supercomputers of the highest performance class since 1987. Tim Gillett talks to Norbert Attig and Thomas Eickermann

Feature

Gemma Church investigates how simulation and modelling de-risks the detection and extraction of geothermal energy resources

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the importance of upgrading legacy laboratory informatics systems and the benefits this provides to scientists