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Argonne announces new associate laboratory director

Theoretical physicist Peter B. Littlewood, formerly the head of the Cavendish Laboratory and the Department of Physics at the University of Cambridge, USA, has been named the new associate laboratory director for Physical Sciences and Engineering at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory.

Littlewood’s depth of research experience, combined with his track record of successful leadership, make him uniquely qualified to take on this new challenge,’ said Argonne director Eric Isaacs. ‘I have every confidence that Dr Littlewood will add further strength to Argonne’s fundamental science capabilities in materials science, nanoscience, chemical sciences and engineering, physics and high-energy physics.’

Littlewood also will hold an appointment as Professor in the Department of Physics, the James Franck Institute, and the College at the University of Chicago.  During his time at Cambridge, he headed the Theory of Condensed Matter group at the Cavendish Laboratory. He also served as Matthias Scholar at Los Alamos National Laboratory during a 2003-2004 sabbatical leave from Cavendish Laboratory.

Prior to joining Cambridge, Littlewood worked at Bell Laboratories from 1980 through 1997, finishing his time there as head of Theoretical Physics Research. His research has focused on the dynamics of collective transport; phenomenology and microscopic theory of high-temperature superconductors, transition metal oxides and other correlated electronic systems; and optical properties of highly excited semiconductors. He has applied his methods to engineering, including holographic storage, optical fibers and devices.

Littlewood holds six patents, has published more than 200 articles in scientific journals and has given more than 200 invited talks at international conferences, universities and laboratories. He is a fellow of the Royal Society of London, the Institute of Physics, the TWAS, Trinity College Cambridge and the American Physical Society.

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