PRESS RELEASE

vizBOXX

BOXX Technologies has released vizBOXX, which is designed to power virtual reality (VR) systems, very large displays, and take advantage of GP-GPU parallel computing.

vizBOXX features a balance of CPU and GPU processing power in a hyper dense 2-by-4U form factor designed to drive high-end simulation and visualisation systems.

With five modules fitting in 4Us of a standard rack, vizBOXX packs the graphics power of five NVIDIA Quadro FX professional-class graphics cards for a total of up to 20 DVI outputs. Five vizBOXX modules also include 10Quad-Core Intel Xeon CPUs, which is enough processing power to perform the intense real-time computations required by immersive virtual reality implementations.

The vizBOXX platform delivers visualisation power in a format that inserts itself easily in high-performance computing (HPC) environments used by scientists and engineers working on complex challenges in fields including: defence, oil and gas exploration, biomedical research, and product development. vizBOXX is the core element in solving tough problems in computational molecular biology, finite element modeling and analysis, network simulation and medical imaging. vizBOXX clusters trigger new insights, foster a collaborative approach to problem-solving, and accelerate time-to-market.

vizBOXX’s exceptional GPU density makes it the ideal platform to take advantage of the massively parallel architectures of NVIDIA Quadro FX graphics processors, now accessible for general purpose (GP) computing through the CUDA development environment. Substantial improvements in processing performance ranging between 10x to 400X are achievable depending on the application. With its compact design, vizBOXX is also the ideal host for getting the most out of NVIDIA Quadro Plex systems.

Each vizBOXX module combines the power of a NVIDIA Quadro FX professional-class, G80-based graphics card with dual Quad-Core Intel Xeon processors.

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