PRESS RELEASE

Transtec expands portfolio

Kronos workstations and Nexxus C deskside supercomputers from Ciara are being added to transtec’s high-performance computing portfolio, the company has announced. Suited to customers who need powerful deskside systems for CAE simulation or CAD applications, both systems feature industrial-standard closed water cooling. This enables the Kronos workstations to be safely overclocked and makes the Nexxus C supercomputers quiet and suitable for deskside installation.

Designed to work with complex applications such as Catia, Ansys, ProEngineer/Creo and NCSIMUL, Kronos workstations are based on Intel Sandy Bridge or Westmere processors. With overclocking, their processing power can be significantly increased to 5.2 GHz and the RAM speed can also be accelerated beyond the manufacturer's specifications. The integrated industrial-grade advanced high-performance cooling system dissipates the heat produced by overclocking. Configured for high speed, the workstations also come with an SSD hard disk, optimised for the needs of engineering and multimedia workstations, and an Nvidia Quadro graphics card. The systems are available single- or dual-core models and as desktop or rackmount systems.

The Nexxus C deskside supercomputer features the Intel Sandy Bridge CPU (Intel Xeon E5-2600 series) and is designed for operation outside dedicated server rooms. One system can provide up to 20 processors, 120 cores, 16 GPGPUs and almost 2TB of memory. The integrated industrial-grade advanced high-performance cooling system results in quiet operation even at full load, while a backplane manages the cables. The computer can also be linked to QDR Infiniband interconnect. 

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