PRESS RELEASE

Symyx Direct 7.0

Symyx has released the Symyx Direct 7.0 data cartridge, a one-stop solution for registering, searching and retrieving chemical and biological entities stored in relational databases.

Supporting the continued expansion of biologics in today's pharmaceutical, biotech, and materials science R&D pipelines, Symyx Direct 7.0 improves R&D efficiency, project team collaboration, and IP management by enabling multidisciplinary project teams to visualise, explore, and compare novel macromolecular sequences and chemical structures stored in a single, fully searchable corporate registry system.

Many scientists today are searching for ways to reduce off-target effects and improve the stability of chemically modified short interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences, peptides, and other large molecules. Aiding these efforts, Symyx Direct 7.0 supports natural post- translational modifications (PTM) and custom modifications while also providing seamless support for D-amino acids and complex cyclisations, including the imidazolinone fluorophore found in the fluorescent proteins.

Symyx Direct 7.0 offers a new, hybrid representation that combines the best features of bioinformatics and cheminformatics notations, improving multidisciplinary collaborative research by enabling scientists to: register and retrieve molecules, reactions, and biomolecular sequences including peptides, oligonucleotides, and oligosaccharides; search for and view chemical modifications in sequences; and develop structure-activity correlations in sequences. 

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