PRESS RELEASE

SureChemOpen

SureChem, a patent chemistry product line of Digital Science, has introduced a new free access option for researchers needing a more effective means of searching the patent literature. Dubbed SureChemOpen, the resource provides free access to the complete SureChem database of chemical structures and full text patents. It integrates patent chemistry into the online scientific research community, enabling linking of patents with other key public and proprietary chemistry data sources.

SureChemOpen is launching in beta mode, open to all users, with additional features planned for release in the coming weeks. In addition to searching by chemical structure and keyword, users will be able to link to SureChem structures that also occur in Royal Society of Chemistry journals and its free ChemSpider chemistry database. The Royal Society of Chemistry is the first of many SureChem content partners working toward a more open, federated chemical information network.

SureChemOpen is the first part of a re-launch of the SureChem product line, offering improved data coverage and a wide range of features and functionalities based on extensive customer feedback. SureChemOpen will be followed by SureChemPro, a fully-featured web app designed for regular patent chemistry users, and SureChemDirect, an enterprise solution that enables the integration of the complete SureChem database with internal tools and workflows.

Company: 
Feature

For functionality and security for externalised research, software providers have turned to the cloud, writes Sophia Ktori

Feature

Robert Roe looks at the latest simulation techniques used in the design of industrial and commercial vehicles

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the growth in cloud technology which is being driven by scientific, engineering and HPC workflows through application specific hardware

Feature

Robert Roe learns that the NASA advanced supercomputing division (NAS) is optimising energy efficiency and water usage to maximise the facility’s potential to deliver computing services to its user community

Feature

Robert Roe investigates the use of technologies in HPC that could help shape the design of future supercomputers