PRESS RELEASE

Qualoupe LIMS

Two Fold Software has added an enhanced materials manager to its Qualoupe LIMS solution, enabling users to define the wide variety of materials tested in an organisation.

The materials manager application allows manufacturers to manage data relating to raw materials, finished products and intermediate products. For a commercial contract laboratory the enhanced materials manager software improves the handling of data from routine samples sent to them for testing by their customers. Many laboratories call these 'specifications', because they like to define what tests are performed when testing samples of a certain material type, and what acceptable limits are applicable to ensure the material meets the necessary specification.

Qualoupe’s materials manager capability has been developed to ensure that there is only one material record that lists all the required specifications within the record. It also addresses another vital need relating to multiple specifications, which occurs where a product is sold to multiple customers who require different limits and different Certificate of Analysis (COA) formats. To simplify the whole process Qualoupe has been developed to allow multiple customers to be linked to any of the specifications attached to the material.

When processing batches or single samples for a specific material, the user can select the specification to be used for processing that batch or single sample.

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